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COLD CHISELS

SEVERAL IMPORTANT THINGS TO REMEMBER

Although it may look easy to use a cold chisel, it takes a lot of skill. Here are several important things to remember when using these forged, heat-treated tools to cut or shear.  

ELIMINATE MUSHROOMED HEADS

A common problem with all struck tools is that of mushrooming. The struck end spreads out as a result of hammering. Flying chips and slippage usually accompany the use of mushroomed chisels Also, the sharp edges can slice a finger like a razor. Properly dress the mushroomed end of the chisel so that  sides are chamfered  at the top, and the top is flat and at right angles to the sides. 

THE CUTTING EDGE

The cutting edge of the chisel must be sharp in order to cut.  Sharpen it by dressing it on a grinding wheel, being careful that the original angle of the cutting edge is maintained as closely as possible. Avoid overheating and possible loss of hardness during dressing by moving the chisel against the wheel lightly and frequently dipping the end of the chisel in water to keep it cool. 

KEEP FREE OF DIRT

Keep chisels free of dirt, grease, or burrs. Properly store chisel for your protection, as well as the chisel's.  

USE THE CORRECT TYPE AND SIZE CHISEL

Always use the correct type and size of chisel for the job. And be sure that you also use a hammer that is heavy enough and large enough for the chisel you select. 

WEAR SAFETY GOGGLES

Always wear safety goggles when chipping, since one of the most common injuries from using a chisel is being stuck in the eye with a chip. Protect others by warning them to keep away from where you're working.  Or by setting up a screen. 

HOLD CHISELS CORRECTLY

There are several correct ways to hold a chisel. Regardless of which you prefer, you should hold it steady, but with a relatively loose grip. If you miss the chisel with the hammer and strike your hand, this grip will help lessen the blow. Of course, the best thing to do is not miss the chisel. 

STRIKING THE CHISEL

Keep your eyes on the cutting edge of the chisel when you are striking a blow. First strike one or two light blows on the chisel to check your swing, to set the chisel, and to keep the swing of the hammer in the same plane as the chisel. Then increase the force as required. 

SMALL PIECES

If you're using a chisel on a small piece, clamp it rigidly in a vise. Avoid marring or otherwise damaging the finished surfaces on the piece in the vise. To do this, use copper covers or caps. Then chip toward the solid or stationary jaw of the vise and never toward yourself. 

LARGE WORK

Large work may require an extra heavy duty cold chisel and sledge hammer. This calls for a two-man team, one using the sledge, and the other holding the chisel with tongs.  

PLAN NOW

Remember: the time to plan on safety precautions is before you start the job. After you or someone else has been injured, it's too late. 

Safety Recommendations:__________________________________________________________________________________

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