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Company Name __________________________ Job Name __________________________ Date________

MISTAKEN SIGNALS,  SIGNALS CROSSED -A LIFE LOST 

A  worker was driving a concrete buggy onto a hoist platform. Or so he thought!  When he arrived where the platform should have been,  it wasn't there. The buggy went over the edge. The man fell forward off the buggy and hit the ground 18' below. Why did this fatal accident occur? The hoist engineer thought that a signal had been given and lowered the platform just before the driver got there.  

STATION SIGNALMAN PROPERLY

How can an accident like this be avoided? The answer is simple: a signal man should be stationed at the elevation where materials are to be loaded or unloaded. The hoist operator should move the platform only after receiving a sign from the signal man. 

SIGNALMAN MUST BE QUALIFIED

The signalman must be a fully qualified, responsible individual with no other duties. This individual must be the only one the operator of equipment looks to for signals. The signals used must be understood by them both. The signalman and the operator must be alert every minute, so that no signal will be badly timed, incorrectly given, or misunderstood. 

NO ONE ELSE SHOULD SIGNAL - EXCEPT IN EMERGENCY

Others nearby should not wave their hands or arms in an attempt to signal the operator. There's just one exception to this rule: "Any-one can give a signal in an emergency". The operator must stop immediately upon receiving such a signal, no matter who gives it. If for any reason the operator can't see the signalman clearly, the operator must dog the hoist so that we can correct the situation. 

STANDARD SIGNALS USED

So there won't be any misunderstanding, we use standard hand signals for all hoisting equipment moves. These signals have been agreed upon by hundreds of construction and industrial companies, and adopted by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). 

DEMONSTRATE THE STANDARD SIGNALS, OR CALL ON A MEMBER OF YOUR GROUP TO DO SO.  

SIGNALS USED FOR MANY JOBS

In the case we described at the beginning of this talk, a signal was misunderstood and a man killed. The possibility of an accident exists wherever signals are given. This may involve setting off a charge of dynamite, backing a truck, swinging a boom near a transmission line, flagging a railroad crossing, or performing a vast number of operations involving hoists or other equipment.  Whether called a signalman, flagman, or spotter, this individual's actions can mean life or death for fellow workers. 

Safety Recommendations:__________________________________________________________________________________

Job Specific Topics:_______________________________________________________________________________________

M.S.D.S Reviewed:_______________________________________________________________________________________

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