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SERIOUS INJURIES 

At our safety meetings we stress accident prevention. And we try to follow through on the job. But accidents sometimes occur despite all of our efforts.  

HELPING A VICTIM MAY DO MORE HARM THAN GOOD

We all are inclined to lend a helping hand when we see a fellow worker injured and suffering. We want to ease the pain and do what ever else we can to aid in the emergency. And this is to our credit. But in some cases, we can do more harm than good. Often it's better to let an injured person alone until professional or trained help arrives. 

TRAINED FIRST AIDERS OFTEN CLOSE AT HAND

Many persons have taken Red Cross first- aid training courses, and one of them is usually close at hand. If so, follow that person's directions. Maybe some of you have taken a first-aid course. If so, let me know, so that we can call on you for assistance in case of emergency. 

REMEMBER THIS IMPORTANT RULE

For those of you who have had no training in first aid, remember this rule: "Do not move an injured person nor try to get that person to stand."  I recall a case in which a laborer suffered a crushed hip. Fellow workers helped him to stand and tried to make him walk. This resulted in intestinal damage, which killed him. In another case, a simple fracture turned into a compound fracture because witnesses persuaded the injured man to get to his feet.  

GET HELP

A good rule to follow when there's an injury is that unless you know what to do, get help. This applies in all cases of serious falls, collisions, crushing injuries, and severe blows by heavy objects or vehicles. Always consider the possibility of injury, even when there's no outward evidence.  Curb your natural tendency to try to get injured persons on their feet. Make the victim as comfortable as you can with the least possible movement. Then let that person alone until trained help arrives. Persuade the victim to stay down and not get up.  

IN CASE OF BLEEDING

In case of bleeding you can help by doing something to stop the flow of  blood. The best way to stop bleeding is to press a clean handkerchief or cloth tightly over the bleeding area. Pressure causes the flow of blood to slow down or stop and allows clotting to take place. In some instances of severe bleeding, or in those cases where the blood can't be controlled by pressure alone, a tourniquet may be necessary to control excessive blood loss adequately. An improperly used tourniquet, however, may cause permanent injury or lead to amputation. OSHA has published the Blood borne Pathogen Standard, which protects those who might be expected to render first aid.  

FIRST-AID COURSES AVAILABLE

If any of you are interested in learning first aid, the Red Cross will be happy to have you attend its classes. You can find out where these classes are conducted by calling the local Red Cross office. First-aid courses also are provided by the U.S. Bureau of Mines.

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